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One Needle, One Thread: Miao (Hmong) embroidery and fabric

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Although step-by-step instructions and clear charts, diagrams and photos are provided for each project, they are not aimed at the beginner, rather a stitcher who already has some experience, and is perhaps looking to learn or experiment with some different techniques. McGuinness was beginning to question the relationship of textiles and gender and his interest has now shifted from a ‘community attached to a place’ to ‘communities that are attached to a shared experience.’ Although he finds the Burren a ‘contemplative and reflective space to work in’ he no longer draws on it as the visual basis for his work. 12 McGuinness had begun to question, ‘Why was I, as a male, making textiles?
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Cats in Embroidery

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He has continued to develop this research into the exhibition Lived Lost Lives which will travel to 6 locations in Ireland between 2013 and 2016. This little fellow is beginning to get his 'grown up' white coat. For details of how to purchase goods while you wait for our ONLINE SHOP please contact us. CRAFT NORTHERN IRELAND and MCBRINN, J., JOHNSTON, M., FLEMING, K., 2007. Students specialised in one or two subjects and textile courses included, Dress, Printed Textiles (hand and machine), Woven Textiles (hand and machine), Knitwear, Fabric Knitting, Lace (hand and machine) and Embroidery (hand and machine).
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Overture and Finale to Linen Embroidery

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The story of how she collected the glass shards also speaks of a different time; of a time when ‘normality’ involved sending foundation art students round to a bomb site to draw it. Nicola Henley says she used to be proud to say ‘I’m a textile artist, an embroiderer … but the response has so often been derogatory in the sense of belittling, of it being woman’s work.’ When people hear the words textile art or embroidery they ‘have already narrowed in their mind what you do’ and ‘that is so demoralising.’ Her education at Goldsmiths prepared her to defend ‘the aesthetic of working as a textile artist and through the medium of textiles as an artist’ but ‘the reality is that the world is not very receptive towards that.’ Henley says the textile artist ‘identity has stuck with me but it doesn’t sit easy’ so now because of her experiences she tends to say ‘I am an artist’ and if necessary expands on this 45 Interview Janet Ledsham, 6/10/2011, Larne, Co Antrim 46 The Arts Council categories are: Music, Drama, Traditional Arts, Visual Arts, Film, Craft, Dance, Literature, Opera, Combined. 47 Interview Helen O’Hare, 27/1/2012, Belfast 454 to say ‘I paint with dyes and pigments and I sometimes use collage or stitch.’ 48 Laura McCafferty used to describe herself as a ‘textile artist’ and still thinks ‘textiles are an amazing material’ but they are ‘just things I use to create’ she doesn’t want to be ‘defined’ or ‘othered’ by the materials she uses, ‘textile art is limiting as a way to label or define yourself now.’ She struggles though when people ask what she does, ‘I say, ‘I’m an artist.’ Then they say, ‘What kind of art do you do?’ And I say, ‘… … uh … I draw.’’ She has considered all the possible terms and how much information she needs to give people and thinks ‘an artist who works with expanded drawing through an interdisciplinary approach’ which is often ‘drawing and textile’ is a good ‘open’ definition, but difficult to say - ‘so I just say artist.’ 49 Deirdre Nelson finds ‘it very hard to describe’ what she does, she used to sometimes say ‘textile artist’ but now she simply describes herself as ‘an artist who uses textiles.’ She doesn’t ‘shy away from using the word embroidery … I wouldn’t call it something like contemporary stitch.’ Though she does find herself ‘shying away a bit from ‘textile art’ and would never use the term ‘fiber art’ that just makes me think of macramé.’ She thinks textile art ‘sounds a little dated now and people have moved away from being very specific … people are going in and out of lots of different things – I don’t think it is as easily defined as it was before.’ 50 Many of the participants tried to avoid labels at all.
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Bead Embroidery

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OUR DAILY Thread Special Home Thread Catalog Wholesale Buying Information Thread Catalog Directory THREAD TIPS Valdani Thread News & Sample ... Nelson later incorporated pops into her work, ‘you don’t have to be old fashioned to use lace making skills – you can find ways to reinvent it.’ One of the outcomes of this residency was a ‘white’ Fish Exchange, Figure 5.37. She travelled to the Shetlands to make a video with designer Alic Starmore. Memories do.’ Alison Erridge CONTENTS FIGURES .................................................................................................... 7 SUMMARY ............................................................................................... 16 NOTES AND ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................... 17 INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................... 20 METHODOLOGY......................................................................................... 27 The Interview process .............................................................................. 27 Analysis of oral history material .............................................................. 33 CHAPTER 1: Irish Embroidery in context ................................................... 35 1.1 Embroidery in Ireland 1820 - partition .............................................. 35 1.2 The North: post-partition ................................................................... 41 1.3 The South: post-partition ................................................................... 56 1.4 Embroidery and women ..................................................................... 59 Summary .............................................................................................. 62 CHAPTER 2: Education and training post-1968 ......................................... 70 2.1 Primary and secondary education ...................................................... 70 2.2 Third level education Dublin ............................................................. 74 Cecil O’Donohue and the Embroidery Designer Group ...................... 81 2.3 Hilda (Lilla) Speir (1915-2007) ........................................................ 109 2.4 Embroidery qualifications and courses ............................................ 116 Belfast................................................................................................. 122 Dublin ................................................................................................. 131 Summary ............................................................................................. 141 CHAPTER 3: Embroidering communities ................................................. 143 3.1 Sewing in the community .................................................................. 147 3.2 Learning in the community.............................................................. 154 3.3 Amateur – professional: ................................................................... 175 Professional artists and amateur stitchers ........................................ 178 3.4 Community projects ......................................................................... 186 Summary ............................................................................................ 204 CHAPTER 4: Art/ craft/ textile art ............................................................ 206 4.1 Women’s art ...................................................................................... 206 4.2 Art - the separation of art and craft ................................................. 209 The reconstruction of art ................................................................... 212 4.3 New craft / textile art ....................................................................... 213 4.4 The craft sector ................................................................................. 219 Summary ............................................................................................ 239 CHAPTER 5: Textiles as an art practice ..................................................... 240 5.1 Identity.............................................................................................. 240 Personal identity ................................................................................ 243 5.2 Critical contexts ................................................................................ 270 5.3 Socially engaged practices ................................................................ 293 5.4 Public art / commissions .................................................................. 305 Exhibitions and exhibiting groups .................................................... 308 Summary ............................................................................................ 312 CHAPTER 6: Troubles textiles ................................................................... 314 6.1 Activating art – fine art responses.................................................... 314 6.2 Stitching the Troubles – Individual responses ................................ 328 6.3 Banners and quilts - group work ...................................................... 350 Healing by making ............................................................................. 365 6.4 War textiles – piecing together stories ............................................ 375 Healing by remembering ................................................................... 377 Summary ........................................................................................... 380 CHAPTER 7: Materials, making and meaning .......................................... 382 7.1 Material qualities and sensory impressions ..................................... 382 7.2 Meaning and memory ...................................................................... 396 7.3 The gap between the text and the textile .......................................... 402 Skill versus inspiration ....................................................................... 410 Working through making ................................................................... 413 7.4 Critical thought and textiles ............................................................. 425 The significance of history ................................................................. 425 Articulation ........................................................................................ 426 Summary ............................................................................................ 431 CHAPTER 8: Workshops and words ......................................................... 432 8.1 Sites of production ........................................................................... 432 Studio influences ................................................................................ 435 8.2 Sites of consumption........................................................................ 443 8.3 Language .......................................................................................... 450 8.4 Textile art now ................................................................................. 462 Textile culture .................................................................................... 466 Summary ............................................................................................ 468 CONCLUSION ....................................................................................... 469 BIOGRAPHIES: ..................................................................................... 472 Appendix 1 .......................................................................................... 487 Appendix 2 ......................................................................................... 488 Appendix 3 ......................................................................................... 489 Appendix 4 ......................................................................................... 490 Appendix 5 ......................................................................................... 491 Appendix 6 ......................................................................................... 492 Appendix 7 ......................................................................................... 493 Appendix 8 ......................................................................................... 495 Appendix 9 ......................................................................................... 502 Appendix 10 ....................................................................................... 504 BIBLIOGRAPHY .................................................................................... 506 Books .................................................................................................. 506 Journals.............................................................................................. 514 Exhibition Catalogues and Publications ............................................ 518 FIGURES CHAPTER 1 1.1 Carrickmacross lace collar, c 1910 1.2 Primrose League Quilt, Tralee, July 18th 1888 1.3 Belfast Municipal Technical Institute, 1908 and 2013 1.4 Textile Industries stained glass window 1.5 Belfast Municipal Technical Institute poster, 1907-08 1.6 Hazel Bruce, corn dollies, Folk Museum, Cultra 1.7 Frances Mary Burroughs, teaching samplers 1.8 Bernadette Browne, student work, 1947-48 1.9 Lucie Charles, cartoon for embroidery, 1950 1.10 Craft organisations and institutions 1890 – present 1.11 Comparative time line of 3 rd level education 1740 – 1968 1.12 Comparative time line of 3 rd level education 1968 – present 1.13 3 rd level embroidery educators CHAPTER 2 2.1 Garnerville graduation, 1968 2.2 Domestic science O-level, student notebook, c1982 2.3 Cecil O’Donohue 2.4 Cecil O’Donohue 1969 newspaper clipping 2.5 The Embroidery Designer Group, Irish Gothic, 1977 2.6 Stone carving Jerpoint Abbey 2.7 Cecil O’Donohue, At the Tip Head 2.8 Sample used to teach the Carrickmacross technique 2.9 David Speir, (untitled) 1943 2.10 Lilla Speir, (?
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A Quillwork Companion: An Illustrated Guide to Techniques of

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#43638296 - multicolored embroidery threads on white background for concepts.. #43638297 - multicolored embroidery threads on white background for concepts.. #43638298 - Embroidery threads with wooden hoops and cross stitch fabric.. #43638165 - Miniature sewing kit with scissors isolated on white for concepts.. #43638162 - Miniature sewing kit with scissors isolated on white for concepts.. #43638190 - Embroidery threads with wooden hoops and cross stitch fabric.. #43638191 - Embroidery threads with wooden hoops and cross stitch fabric.. #43638281 - multicolored embroidery threads on white background for concepts.. #41149840 - Needlework is a beautiful talent.
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How Fragrant the Rose: Samplers & Historic Embroideries

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These include a range of both craft and digital CAD facilities. But eventually they branched out to hoops, transfer patterns, paint books and tubes and kids kits. The specific meaning held by a specific piece of cloth may be uniquely personal but people are experienced with textiles and can pick up even subtle meanings associated with cloth and interpret them through their own experiences. Vibrant woolen carpets with geometric and floral designs are an important crafted product.
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Tigrey Leads the Parade

April 8, 2015 admin 0

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What was your route to becoming an artist? (Formal training or another pathway?) I started with books, teaching myself free machine embroidery. Compiling a complete list of books in the DMC library is a work in progress. Craft as a set of concerns was moving out of isolation and into more mainstream discourses. It comprises five motifs, one in the center and one each in the four corners. It is invisible and indefinable, nevertheless it does exist - it operates through informal networks and has been both evident and supportive throughout the research.
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Making Needlework Accessories Embroidered with Beads

April 8, 2015 admin 0

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We take pride in our work and put out a quality one of a kind product. I, whose life was always geared to the next thing, - when I’m grown up, have a job, children of my own, Christmas, Easter, after your exams, when your father comes home, after I’m gone, - I, at sixty, knew that from that moment life wold be largely backward-looking, reminiscent, anecdotal, and in my work since then I have tried, remembering the wild geese, to hold the intensity of ‘nowness’ that I felt then, expressing my own present tense.
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Hankie Flower Angels with Ribbon Embroidery

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Even when the volunteer makers are acknowledged the relationship is not always as benign as it might appear. 88 E-mail correspondence with Waifun Wong between 3/12/2013 and 7/12/2013. 89 Interview Deirdre Nelson, 21/12/2011, Jordanstown, Belfast 181 Figure 3.18 Tom Molloy, Behind Every Great Man, 2006 (and detail) Cross stitch embroidery on canvas, 26 x 26 cm (44 squares) Arts Council of Ireland Collection, Image courtesy of the artist 182 Figure 3.19 Fail, Duncan Ross, 2012 Thread on Aida Cloth, Wood, 12.8cm x 9.5cm (x 3.3cm deep) (as accredited in Catalyst Arts: Collective Histories of Northern Irish Art X Golden Thread Gallery, Belfast 2013) 183 Figure 3.20 Christina Henri, Roses from the Heart, 25,566 bonnets, 2007 – ongoing Top: 8,000 Bonnet Installation, Festival of Quilts, NEC Birmingham, 2010 Below: Joy McCormick, bonnet (2009), hand-made lace and embroidery on linen. (featured on Christina Henri’s Facebook page, 4 th December 2013) Images courtesy of Christina Henri 184 Figure 3.21 Lycia Trouton, The Linen Memorial, (detail with hair) Image courtesy of the artist 185 Christina Henri (a conceptual artist from Tasmania) is running a project, Roses from the Heart, which seeks to make 25,566 bonnets as a memorial to the British and Irish women who were sent as convicts to Australia, Figure 3.20.
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Gay Gadgets- Home Decorations- Accessories-Crochet

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Oxford; New York: Berg, distributed in the U. IMMA held a major retrospective of her work ‘Becoming’ (2012) with an accompanying book. A Needle Craft site of unique designs for Blackwork, Cross-stitch, Canvaswork with online catalogue. You agree that you will not upload, post, e-mail or otherwise transmit Materials to us or our Affiliates that contain software viruses or any other computer code, files, or programs designed to interrupt, destroy or limit the functionality of any computer software or hardware or telecommunications equipment. 9) No Obligation.
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